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Northwestern University


Weekly Astrophysics Seminars 2014-2015

Seminars are held at 4:00 PM on Tuesdays in Room F160
on the first floor of the Technological Institute (2145 Sheridan Road) unless otherwise noted

 

Spring Quarter 2015

  Date      Speaker / Seminar Host
  March 31

Marilena Loverde
   The University of Chicago

Claude-André
Faucher-Giguère

  April 7

Dawn Erb
   University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Claude-André
Faucher-Giguère

  April 21

Geoffrey Vasil
   The University of Sydney

Claude-André
Faucher-Giguère

  April 28

Tony Piro
   Carnegie Institute for Science

Francesca Valsecchi

  May 5

Phil Muirhead
   Boston University

Jason Steffen

  May 19

Edwin Bergin
   University of Michigan
    Dissecting the Explosions and Environments of Nearby Supernovae

Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). In this talk, I will highlight techniques we have developed to ascertain the role of explosion geometry and environment in shaping these SNRs. I will discuss application of these methods to extensive multiwavelength data of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs, and I will explore the implications regarding the nature of the progenitors and the dynamical evolution of these sources.

Farhad Zadeh

  May 26

Tom Abel
   Stanford University
    Dark Matter Dynamics

Computational Physics allows us to study extremely non-linear systems with fidelity. In astrophysical hydrodynamics and studies of galaxy formation much of the last two decades we have explored various discretization techniques and found subtle differences in some applications. Interestingly numerical studies of collisionless fluids such as e.g. the collapse of cold dark matter to form the large scale structure of the Universe has only been studied meaningfully with one approach; N-body Monte Carlo techniques. I will introduce a novel simulation approach, and demonstrate its feasibility, that for the first time can study a collisionless system in the continuum limit in multi-dimensions. I will also show this new technique opens a new window in making sense of structure formation as well as plasma physics. In this context we have developed a novel rasterization/voxelization algorithm applicable in computational geometry, computational physics, CAD design and other fields. I show how these approaches allow also for much improved predictions for gravitational lensing, dark matter annihilation, properties of cosmic velocity fields , and many other applications.

Fred Rasio

  June 2

Garth Illingworth
   UC Santa Cruz

Mel Ulmer


Fall Quarter 2015

  Date      Speaker / Seminar Host
  Oct. 20

Laura Chomiuk
   Michigan State University

Fred Rasio


For more information, contact: Janet Howe (janet.howe@northwestern.edu)


Past Astrophysics Seminars