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“Remember that meteor that lit up Chicago’s night sky two years ago? Scientists are searching for it at the bottom of Lake Michigan.”

Members and volunteers for the Aquarius Project search for meteorites while sorting through everything that their Starfall sled contraption has picked up from the lakebed. (Image Credit: Camille Fine / Chicago Tribune)

“The morning after the Lake Michigan strike, Hammergren and Shane Larson (now an associate professor of astrophysics at Northwestern University, then a researcher at Adler) began an email chat with Bresky, a sometime actor and playwright who runs teen outreach at Adler. They casually, then seriously, discussed hunting a meteorite. Bresky had been looking for a project for his high school interns, but Hammergren, aware of the lack of precedent here, didn’t see the idea initially as more than wistful. Other than a successful expedition in the Pacific in the 1970s that found meteorite fragments, most water recoveries are limited to lucky witnesses who literally dive into a lake or ocean just after a meteorite strikes. Still, Bresky was able to convince Adler to make a hunt the focus of its teen programs; in fact, most of the funding for Aquarius comes not from NASA or the National Science Foundation but from these outreach programs for fledgling scientists.”

Read the full article in The Chicago Tribune, “Remember that meteor that lit up Chicago’s night sky two years ago? Scientists are searching for it at the bottom of Lake Michigan” by Christopher Borrelli.