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SN 2019ehk

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SN 2019ehk

Artist’s interpretation of the calcium-rich supernova 2019ehk. Shown in orange is the calcium-rich material created in the explosion. Purple coloring represents gas shedded by the star right before the explosion, which then produced bright X-ray emission when the material collided with the supernova shockwave. Learn more: Calcium-rich supernova examined with X-rays for first time

Aaron M. Geller, Northwestern University

GRB181123B

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GRB181123B

The afterglow of GRB181123B, captured by the Gemini North telescope. Learn more: Short gamma ray burst leaves most-distant optical afterglow ever detected

International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/K. Paterson & W. Fong (Northwestern University).

SN2019yvq in the Host Galaxy NGC 4441

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SN2019yvq in the Host Galaxy NGC 4441

Zwicky Transient Facility composite image of SN2019yvq (blue dot in the center of the image) in the host galaxy NGC 4441 (large yellow galaxy in the center of the image), which is nearly 140 million light-years away from Earth. SN 2019yvq exhibited a rarely observed ultraviolet flash in the days after the star exploded. Learn

ZTF/A. A. Miller (Northwestern University) and D. Goldstein (Caltech)

SN2016aps

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SN2016aps

A supernova at least twice as bright and energetic, and likely much more massive than any yet recorded has been identified by an international team of astronomers. Continue to the full article at University of Birmingham News. View the Nature Astronomy article, “An extremely energetic supernova from a very massive star in a dense medium”

Aaron M. Geller – Northwestern IT

CSS161010’s Host Galaxy

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CSS161010’s Host Galaxy

A direct image of CSS161010’s host galaxy taken with W. M. Keck Observatory’s DEIMOS instrument, shown in the bottom square and magnified in the larger top square. Observations show it is a dwarf galaxy located 500,000,000 light years away in the direction of the constellation Eridanus. Learn more: Astrophysicists Capture New Class of Transient Objects

Giacomo Terreran, CIERA/Northwestern University

Magnetic Orion

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Magnetic Orion

An Astrophysical Journal paper presenting data obtained with SOFIA’s HAWC+ camera was highlighted by being chosen for NASA’s “Astronomy Picture of the Day” on February 27th. Professor Giles Novak and CIERA visiting scholar Marc Berthoud led the development of the data pipeline for HAWC+. The lead author of the paper is Professor David Chuss of Villanova

NASA, SOFIA, D. Chuss et al. & ESO, M. McCaughrean et al.

CIERA’s 10th Annual Public Lecture, “The NU Astronomy of Stars, Black Holes, and Cosmic Explosions”

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CIERA’s 10th Annual Public Lecture, “The NU Astronomy of Stars, Black Holes, and Cosmic Explosions”

CIERA’s 10th annual public lecture was presented October 11, 2018 by director Vicky Kalogera. Kalogera’s talk–a glimpse into the years of fascinating work conducted by CIERA–highlighted key discoveries and what they mean for the future of astronomy. Kalogera discussed the lives of stars, how their influence on the Cosmos has changed in the recent decade,

CIERA / Northwestern

  • Event,
  • Interdisciplinary

Radio Rebound Powered by Jets from Gamma-Ray Burst

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Radio Rebound Powered by Jets from Gamma-Ray Burst

Astronomers using ALMA studied a cataclysmic stellar explosion known as a gamma-ray burst, or GRB, and found its enduring “afterglow.” The rebound, or reverse shock, triggered by the GRB’s powerful jets slamming into surrounding debris, lasted thousands of times longer than expected. These observations provide fresh insights into the physics of GRBs, one of the

National Radio Astronomy Observatory

How many merger binary black holes are there?

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How many merger binary black holes are there?

How many merger binary black holes are there? There are lots of uncertainties in our understanding of stellar evolution. This plot shows one prediction from the COMPAS population synthesis code for the number of gravitational-wave detections:  there would be about 500 detections per year of observing time once our detectors reach design sensitivity! In Barrett, Gaebel,

Barrett, Gaebel, Neijssel, Vigna-Gómez, Stevenson, Berry, Farr, & Mandel (2018)

BLAST-TNG

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BLAST-TNG

Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope – The Next Generation (BLAST-TNG) BLAST is a 5,000 pound balloon-borne telescope bound for the stratosphere over Antarctica, to search for the origins of stars and planets. This photo was taken by graduate student Paul Williams in the summer of 2018 in Palestine, Texas at the Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility.

Gabriele Coppi / University of Pennsylvania

Revealing the Lives of Stars Through the Cataclysmic Collisions of Black Holes

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Revealing the Lives of Stars Through the Cataclysmic Collisions of Black Holes

Northwestern Physics and Astronomy student Mike Zevin presents a talk as part of the Northwestern Ready Set Go (RSG) program. The goals of the program are to increase awareness for the urgent need for excellent research communicators and to coach graduate and post doctoral researchers to improve their own presentation skills. The program focuses on three important

Northwestern's RSG Program

Balloons Above Antarctica: The Coolest Place to Put a Telescope

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Balloons Above Antarctica: The Coolest Place to Put a Telescope

Northwestern Physics and Astronomy student Paul Williams presents a talk as part of the Northwestern Ready Set Go (RSG) program. The goals of the program are to increase awareness for the urgent need for excellent research communicators and to coach graduate and post doctoral researchers to improve their own presentation skills. The program focuses on three important

Northwestern's RSG Program